Amazing things will happen

I’m a quote person.  I like inspirational words and phrasing, and especially vocalized in a certain way.  There are three quotes above my desk right now.

Your desire to change must be greater than your desire to stay the same.  

We find the great thing in this world is not so much where we stand, as in what direction we are moving.  -Oliver Wendell Holmes

Sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast. – Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking Glass

Do you sense a trend?

That first quote about change was in my old office at a job I knew I couldn’t continue long term.  I need more, and that helped remind me to keep moving towards my goal.  Staying the same is completely fine in certain circumstances, but change is always possible, somehow, and as needed.

The second quote about direction I tore from my nephew’s high school graduation announcement.  Meant to be hopeful for 18-year olds heading off into the world, it was also inspirational for this 46-year old in the middle of a long job search.

And the Lewis Carroll is my far-reaching quote, and it is inspiring and emotional for me.  It’s a quote for dreamers who keep dreaming, for hopers and believers in some day, and for those who continue to work and know that it takes every bit of effort, overwhelming belief, and a little bit of luck, to get what you want.

To the left of these quotes is a window looking out to green, and a board with a few more bits of inspiration.  I love these words as well, except the bottom corner.  I’m not here to live the life I was destined for.  I’m here to live the life I make happen.

 

Another installment of a personal happiness project, revisited.

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Heartbreak Hangover

Yesterday, my day started with hope.  I agree with the SiriusXM sports announcers who say it is the greatest day in all of sports – Day 1 of the NCAA Tournament.  It’s Christmas morning and the best birthday you’ve ever had.  You wake with that anticipation.  Swelling music should follow you around.  You’ve set your bracket.  You start the trash talk.  You watch all the videos March Madness has to offer.  You relive dunk shots and swats, and those perfect 3-pointers.  You recall the stats and heights of players who are preparing for battle.  You learn about campuses that never existed in your brain before.  You are full of the madness.  I was full.

My bracket probably looked a lot different than yours.  At the center of 64 was my alma mater – PURDUE – written in capital letters and highlighted.  #boilerup scrolled on top.  #hammerdown written beneath.  A loyalty bracket, they called it.  Mine looks the same every time, in the years when I’m lucky enough to see that name in the group.  Fellow alumni may have chosen North Carolina or Kansas again.  I can’t do that.  Call it delusional.  Call it stupid. I don’t care.  I call it faith.  I call it hope.  I see the world through gold and black colored glasses.

I am an all-weather fan.  It comes from sitting in Ross-Ade Stadium during the Fred Akers years.  It comes from the hope that, if you could just beat iu, that it would make the whole season okay.  My first football game, freshmen year, was Purdue vs. Miami of Ohio.  I sat there with a couple hundred of my closest friends, sweating in black, wool All-American Marching Band uniforms, when the skies opened up.  I think it rained four inches during that game.  Lightning hit the field.  That should have been a sign.  But week after week, for four years, I sat, marched, and played through those games – sweating, freezing, hoping.

I always hope.

Yesterday too.  I felt it.  I didn’t even consider that they wouldn’t win that game.

I was elated at the half.  I loved watching the dog fight.  I yelled their names and threw my fists in the air.  I hopped up and down and clapped with joy.  And then …  and then …  Double OT was what I got for loving the dog fight.

And then …

You feel pain differently when you go from hope to heartbreak.  Those damn colored glasses.

And then …

Negative internet commenters are the drudge of the earth.  You hide behind your anonymous Twitter profile and slam a 22-year old who misses a shot?  You call for firing the coach?  You use words like “hack”, “choke”, and “pathetic” to describe a team that could have just as easily given you a metaphorical blow job with one more basket and a stronger 3PT%.  You sit on your couch and you run the world.  But you are not there.  You are not them.  You are not.

They are.

They were there on that court with talent and pride, knowledge and muscle memory, with training and coaching, and yes, with hope.  You can’t tell me RayD didn’t feel the same hope I did.  And the joy I felt when AJ dunked was the same as Isaac’s joy.  The pride, the loyalty … they were shared feelings across many miles yesterday.  The frustration, the disbelief, the heartbreak … they were shared.  They are shared.

We’ve been there before, and I have to hope we won’t be there again.  I must.  After years of heartbreaking situations, I remain ever grateful, ever true.

Thank you BoilerBall.  It was a hell of a season.  I’m sorry it didn’t go our way.  Your way.  But I believe in you as players and coaches, as a team, as good men.

I remain proud.  I remain hopeful.  I believe.  Hail Purdue.  Boiler Up.  BTFU.

 

Believe

To believe in something, and not to live it, is dishonest.    ― Mahatma Gandhi

Last month and the month before, when everything was covered in blue and white or red and green and sparkles, some of you may have celebrated one holiday or another.  Maybe you celebrated American Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, the Winter Solstice, Kwanzaa, Boxing Day, Human Rights Day… That one is December 10 in case you want to mark your calendar.  Some of you said “Merry Christmas”.  Some of you may have been upset that others said “Happy Holidays”.

Last month, someone I know who celebrates Christmas asked me a question.  They had recently learned that I am one who says “Happy Holidays”.  And the question was, “This time of year, what does someone like YOU believe?”  Keep in mind, this was not a question of sincere interest.  It was phrased with a derogatory tone.  I think they actually looked down their nose at me.  The stressed words in the question were “someone like you”.  She meant, someone who says “Happy Holidays”.  She meant, a heathen.

Last month and the month before, I loved, I laughed, I cried, I gave gifts, I was thankful, I celebrated, I hugged, I wished, I traveled, I fought, I stayed positive, I believed.  I believed in love, in human beings, in laughter, in friendship, giving and being thankful, celebrations, hugging and kissing, wishing and hoping, traveling and taking a journey.  I believed in me, and in you, and in those who say “Merry Christmas”, “Happy Holidays” or any other greeting, regardless of whether they look down their noses at others or not.

I believe that, if more of us celebrated Human Rights Day, that we all could believe in anything we want to.

Last month, when I was asked what someone like ME believes in, I refrained from the profanity on the tip of my tongue.  I simply looked in the direction of my amazing Chinese students and said, “Well, to begin with, I believe in them.  Even if you don’t.”