Twelve Months. Twelve Days. Twelve Moments.

To wrap up my year, I decided to choose one picture from each month of my phone’s 2015 camera roll.  When I actually sat down to do it, it wasn’t so easy.  Do you choose your favorite picture, or a picture of your favorite day, or a shot of something you still laugh about now, months later?   And it’s different choosing a picture now versus what I may have chosen months ago.  Our memories change.  Our emotions change.

These twelve pictures were clicks on my phone.  So fast.  They were simple and memorable and perfect in their own way.  That’s what moments are.  They add up to the hours of our days, and the days of our months and years.  Sartre compared moments to little diamonds.  Aren’t they though?  Some small, some big, some you’ll never have … some brilliant, some rough, all perfect in their own way.

It’s good to look back as we set intentions for the new year.  There are important people and important things that happen in our lives every single day.  It is about those big goals we set in front of us, and it’s about the little things too.  The lovely perfect and not-so-perfect things.  It is about the things we looked forward to, and those we never intended on, never planned on, never knew would come.  It is about the every day, and how we live each moment.

Enjoy.

“She smiled and said with an ecstatic air: “It shines like a little diamond”,
“What does?”
“This moment. It is round, it hangs in empty space like a little diamond; I am eternal.”
― Jean-Paul Sartre, The Age of Reason

 

“If the whole world I once could see
On free soil stand, with the people free
Then to the moment might I say,
Linger awhile. . .so fair thou art.”
― Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust: First Part

New Outlook

After 4 years in 10D, we have a new view.  The diamond is slightly obstructed now, but look what we get in return.  A different skyline.  The 72 story Maoye building.  The gorgeous Kepu Park.  The tai qi ladies in their blue and red silks making their moves at 6am.  Kites flying in the library field.  At night, we can see the K lit up on the Kempinski Hotel 3km up Qingnian.  And 2km past that, that circle building with cranes sticking out the top.  So despite a new upstairs neighbor who wears high heels at home, and the feline issues with shifts in sunlight, all is well.

Call it a cultural experience.  When a couple gets married in China, it is the husband’s family that is responsible for a place to live, maybe a car, the wedding, etc.  More than a year ago, our landlord’s son got married.  With their baby on the way, the landlord will give our old apartment to his son and daughter in law, and the soon-to-be grandchild.   They were apologetic and appreciated our care of the old place.  They wished us well, and were happy to know we would stay in the neighborhood.  In fact, we now live in the same building as the landlord’s mother.  Maybe she is one of those tai qi ladies?

A new view or a new outlook are sometimes forced upon us.  Sometimes, we have to find a new place to sleep in the sun.  We could look at it as a pain the ass, or we can just accept it, deal with it, do it.  And who knows what we might get in return.

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